Probably Fiction

I'll take a paperback from the shelf... and eat it!

123 notes

On agency

the-right-writing:

Many of my followers have asked me exactly what I mean when I talk about agency and why agency is important.

The simplest definition would probably be that when a character has agency, they move the plot forward because of actions that they choose to do. Agency is important because without it, there is no reason for a character to have the personality you chose for them. They could be replaced with a blow-up doll and the plot would go on the same way.

The character needs to choose these actions because of their unique personality and not just do what the majority of people would do in a similar situation. Again, why even give them a personality if they’re not going to use it in the story? This is why a villain who sets his enemy’s house on fire is more interesting than one who just gripes to his husband and likewise why a hero who rushes into a burning building to save her loved ones is more interesting than one who just watches in shock or calls 911 and goes home.

If your story has fate in it, agency means that they generally do things because they want to and not just because fate says so. Fate can exist in tandem with your characters’ desires or be the kind of fate that the strong can fight off.

Note that there is a problem in literature with female characters lacking agency. Though it isn’t as harmful to society, there is also a problem with protagonists lacking agency.

38,288 notes

saucywenchwritingblog:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

THIS!  I see so many people post art or stories and say it’s just a drabble or doodle, it probably isn’t any good, people aren’t going to like it. 
There are always going to be people who are willing to tear you down.  Don’t do their work for them.  Even if you can’t say good things, it doesn’t mean you have to say negative things. 

saucywenchwritingblog:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

THIS!  I see so many people post art or stories and say it’s just a drabble or doodle, it probably isn’t any good, people aren’t going to like it. 

There are always going to be people who are willing to tear you down.  Don’t do their work for them.  Even if you can’t say good things, it doesn’t mean you have to say negative things. 

(via thewritingcafe)

16,766 notes

vegan-bogan:

asylum-art:

10 Magical Pebble Paths That Flow Like Rivers

The garden or back-yard is one of the best places in a home for the home-owner to express their creative side. Why surround all those beautiful plants with an ugly path when you can create a creative stone garden path that looks like a work of art? We collected this list to show you what a well-done pebble garden path can look like.

River stones and pebbles worked really well for the projects in these pictures, but just about any stone can work as long as you can think of a cool design with it and turn it into a stable path.

  1. Judy White
  2. unknown
  3.  Claire Ashman
  4. Francesca Gallo
  5.  sarako
  6. pebbleandcomosaics.com
  7. Sarah Garner
  8. lorifeger.hubpages.com
  9. Chuck Domitrovich
  10. Jeffrey Bale

Yes. All of this.

(via ranetree)

Filed under art scenery